UNIT 1: MISS JULIE: Sweden: Women in the 1920s

women 1920sIn 1902 the National Association for Women’s Suffrage was founded. In 1906 the suggestion of women’s suffrage was voted down in parliament again. In 1909, the right to vote in municipal elections was extended to include also married women. The same year, women were granted eligibility to municipal councils, and in the following 1910–11 municipal elections, forty women were elected to different municipal councils, Gertrud Månsson being the first. In 1914 Emilia Broomé became the first woman in the legislative assembly.

The right to vote in national elections was not returned to women until 1919, and was practiced again in the election of 1921, for the first time in 150 years.

After the 1921 election, the first women were elected to Swedish Parliament after the suffrage: Kerstin Hesselgren in the Upper chamber and Nelly Thüring (Social Democrat), Agda Östlund (Social Democrat) Elisabeth Tamm (liberal) and Bertha Wellin (Conservative) in the Lower chamber. Karin Kock-Lindberg became the first female government minister, and in 1958, Ulla Lindström became the first acting Prime Minister.

Family life

As in many other Western countries, the connection between fertility and marriage has been significantly weakened in the past decades. Sweden was one of the first European countries to change its social norms towards unmarried cohabitation and childbearing, at a time where this was still seen as unacceptable in many other parts of the continent.

 

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